• Services
  • Online Resource Center
  • FAQ's
  • News and Videos
  • Employer Information
  • Contact Us/Directions
  •  

    FAQ's

     

     

    1. What does CSEA stand for?
    2. What types of services are offered at the CSEA? 
    3. Where can I get a Title IV-D application? 
    4. What does IV-D (4-D) stand for? 
    5. When I am on public assistance, will I receive both child support and public assistance benefits?
    6. Do I have to use the CSEA if both parents have worked out a payment arrangement between us? 
    7. Can the CSEA help with visitation? 
    8. Why should I have paternity established on my child/ren? 
    9. What is genetic testing? 
    10. What are the methods of establishing paternity? 
    11. I am on unemployment compensation. Is there a limit on the amount that can be taken out for child support? 
    12. Can I get support from a non-residential parent who is in jail or in prison? 
    13. What do I do when children have emancipated and there is still money owed? 
    14. Can the CSEA collect for support if the non-custodial parent is in the military? 
    15. The non-custodial parent lives in another state and is self employed. What can I do to obtain support? 
    16. I receive / pay child support, how do I change my address? 
    17. The non-custodial parent quit their job to attend school full time. Do they still have to pay child support? 
    18. The non-custodial parent of my child does not live in Ohio. Can I establish paternity and get a support order? 
    19. What are the child support guidelines? 
    20. Are the earnings of both parents considered in setting support? 
    21. Are there any adjustments allowed for second families in the guidelines? 
    22. Do the guidelines allow an adjustment for the parent who is paying for child care? 
    23. Is there any allowance for the parent who has to pay health insurance? 
    24. What does it mean to be "in default" of a child support order and what can happen to me if I go into default? 
    25. What if I don't agree that I am in default? Do I have appeal rights? 
    26. The non-custodial parent collects social security disability. Can there be income withholding on that check? 
    27. I've heard there is a law called UIFSA. What does this law do? 
     
    1. What does CSEA stand for?
    SEA stand for Child Support Enforcement Agency.
     
    2. What types of Services are offered at the CSEA?
    Anyone receiving Public Assistance is eligible for free child support services and is required to cooperate with the CSEA in establishing paternity and collecting child support. Families that do not receive public assistance benefits can apply for services with a written IV-D application.
     
    3. Where can I get a Title IV-D Application? 
    You may pick up the application at your local CSEA or call your local CSEA and have one mailed to you.
     
    4. What does IV-D (4-D) stand for?
    IV-D (4D) stands for the sections of the Federal Law under the Social Security Act that created the Child Support Enforcement Program. If you are on Public Assistance you must complete the IV-D Application.
     
    5. When I am on public assistance, will I receive both child support and public asssistance benefits?
    No, when you are receiving public assistance any money that is collected during that time will be used to reimburse the state up to the amount of the grant for the Assistance you have received. If you have received both, please report and return it to the CSEA.
     
    6. Do I have to use the CSEA if both parents have worked out a payment arrangement between us?
    Any arrangement made by both parents can change at any time for many reasons. The CSEA will keep track of any and all payments made through the CSEA. This way you are making sure you are receiving the support due for your children. If you are receiving public assistance you must work with the CSEA to have your payments processed. Any payments that are received outside the CSEA are considered a gift and may not be credited to your account.
     
    7. Can the CSEA help with visitation?
    The CSEA cannot assist you with visitation rights. The process must be handled through the courts.
     
    8. Why should I have paternity established on my child/ren?
    There are many benefits of having paternity established for your child/ren:
    • Identity - Your child knows who their true parents are and can share in both of the parents lives.
    • Financial - Both parents have the responsibility to financially support their child.
    • Social Security- If either parent passes away the child may be eligible for Social Security benefits.
    • Inheritance - Your child may be entitled to family Inheritance.
    • Health Insurance - A parent who has established paternity legally can put a child on the Health Insurance Policy.
    • Health - If your child should become ill, it is very important to know the health history of both parents and their families. This information can save a child/rens life.
     
    9. What is Genetic Testing?
    Genetic testing is a procedure to establish a likelihood that the putative father is or is not the biological father of a child. Genetic test is Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) typing of blood or buccal cell samples.
     
    10. What are the methods of Establishing Paternity?
    Paternity can be established in out-of-wedlock births in Ohio by the following methods:
    • Both parents completing an Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit (JFS 07038):
    • The Child Support Enforcement Agency issuing an Administrative Order determining the existence of a parent and child relationship; or
    • The Court issuing a judicial Order determining the existence of a parent child relationship.
     
    11. I am on Unemployment Compensation. Is there a limit on the amount that can be taken out for child support?
    Yes. The Ohio Bureau of Employment Services can only take up to 50% of the non-custodial parent's unemployment benefits to pay the child support. If the unemployment compensation benefits are insufficient to meet the entire obligation, arrears will accrue on the order.
     
    12. Can I get support from a non-custodial parent who is in jail or in prison?
    Yes. There can be income withholding from prison earnings. In addition, support will continue to accrue during the period of incarceration. Please contact your local CSEA.
     
    13. What do I do when children have emancipated and there is still money owed?
    Emancipation does not terminate arrears. You should contact your CSEA so that they may review your individual circumstances.
     
    14. Can the CSEA collect for support if the non-custodial parent is in the military?
    Yes. The Montgomery County CSEA can take steps to do a withholding through the military system.
     
    15. The non-custodial parent lives in another state and is self employed. What can I do to obtain support?
    We can register your support order in another state for enforcement. The child support agency in another state will then be able to use all the enforcement tools available under its state law to collect your support.
    • Domestic Relations (DR) Court Orders - both parties can sign an affidavit to wave any or all arrearages owed to the custodial parent. Arrears owed to the state (occurred while receiving benefit from the state)cannot be waived. The CSEA will submit to court for further review and possible credit for direct payment.
    • Juvenile Court (JC) Orders - parties may retain an attorney or file their own motion through Juvenile Court Clerk of Court to discuss possible credit.
    • Administrative (ADM) Orders - custodial parent may contact the local CSEA for an administrative affidavit waiving the arrearage amount.
    Remember only money that is owed to the custodial parent can be waived. Any money that is owed to the state cannot be waived.
     
    16. I receive / pay child support, how do I change my address?
    Address change for custodial parents have to be in writing by mail, fax or in person. Address changes for non-custodial parent can be received by phone, fax, in writing and in person.
     
    17. The non-custodial parent quit their job to attend school full time. Do they still have to pay Child Support?
    Yes. The non-custodial parent is obligated to pay their child support until the court changes the amount, suspends the order or terminates the order.
     

    Case Establishment Questions & Answers

     
    18. The non-custodial parent of my child does not live in Ohio. Can I establish paternity and get a support order?
    Yes. Your local CSEA can help you establish paternity and get a support order, regardless of where the non-custodial parent lives. In some cases, this can even be done if he lives in another country.
     

    Child Support Guidelines Questions & Answers

     
    19. What are the Child Support Guidelines?
    The guidelines passed by the Ohio legislature calculate Child Support orders based upon the financial circumstances of both parents. Use of these guidelines is required for the establishment or modification of all child support orders in Ohio. The amount of child support which is calculated using the worksheets and schedules contained in these guidelines is presumed under the law to be the correct amount of child support in each case.
     
    20. Are the earnings of both parents considered in setting support?
    Yes.
     
    21.Are there any adjustments allowed for second families in the guidelines?
    Yes. The guidelines allow an adjustment equal to the federal tax exemption for each child who is your biological child from another relationship, as long as the child is living with you.
     
    22. Do the guidelines allow an adjustment for the parent who is paying for child care?
    Yes. The guidelines provide a credit for child care expenses for those children included in the order, relating to work, employment training or education.
     
    23. Is there any allowance for the parent who has to pay health insurance?
    Yes. The guidelines provide a credit for marginal, out-of-pocket costs of health insurance which will therefore affect the amount of the order.
     

    Enforcement Questions & Answers

     
    24. What does it mean to be "in default" of a Child Support order and what can happen to me if I go into default?
    If you get behind at least one full month in child support payments, you are in default. You will be sent a form outlining the enforcement remedies that may be taken to secure support.
     
    25. What if I don't agree that I am in default? Do I have appeal rights?
    You are only entitled to request an administrative hearing to decide if the arrearage amount is correct and if you are the correct person who owes the money. If you disagree with the administrative hearing decision, you may file for a court hearing.
     
    26. The non-custodial parent collects Social Security Disability. Can there be income withholding on that check?
    Yes, there can be income withholding for Social Security Disability and Social Security Retirement benefits. There cannot be a withholding for SSI because those benefits are a form of public assistance.
     
    27. I've heard there is a law called UIFSA. What does this law do?
    UIFSA (Uniform Interstate Family Support Act) is a law regulating the establishment and enforcement of child support orders where the parents live in different states or where the support order is in a state other than where either of the parents live.