Affordable Care Act Task Force

Affordable Care Act (ACA) Task Force

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The Montgomery County Board of County Commissioners established the Montgomery County Affordable Care Act Task Force on February 12, 2013. The Commissioners felt it was appropriate to appoint an Affordable Care Act Task Force to prepare the community for the implementation and its impacts on the human services safety net in Montgomery County.  This Task Force initiated their work with four primary goals. 1) Develop an understanding of the issues; 2) Review our Current status; 3) Develop Recommendations; 4) Provide an action plan and steps for readiness.

Co-chairs of the Affordable Care Act Task Force: 
Brian Bucklew, President and CEO, Greater Dayton Area Hospital Association
James Gross, Montgomery County Health Commissioner
Helen Jones-Kelley, Executive Director, ADAMHS Board for Montgomery County

 

 

BACKGROUND
The Leaders of Montgomery County know that healthcare for a vulnerable population in Montgomery County is not a new topic.  The Healthcare Safety Net Task Force was this region’s first community wide focus on battling the issues of our underserved, vulnerable population. Appointed in September 2006 by the Montgomery County Commissioners, the Task Force was charged with recommending an innovative vision and achievable set of strategies to improve and finance the healthcare safety net for vulnerable populations in Montgomery County. With much success, Montgomery County has been able to continue to improve our access and care and to look at the past to find new ways to move forward during this time of change.  

 

 

Excerpt from 2013 Executive Summary of the ACA Task Force Final Report by HPIO
The Montgomery County Affordable Care Act Task Force (MCACATF) was created in April 2013 to prepare the community for the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and its impact on the human service safety net in Montgomery County. The MCACATF contracted with the Health Policy Institute of Ohio (HPIO) to conduct an environmental scan and assessment of the current access, capacity, and delivery system of the physical, behavioral, and dental healthcare safety net for vulnerable populations in Montgomery County. Conducted between May and September 2013, the scan included qualitative research to assess how the safety net is currently working for vulnerable populations, and quantitative research to review data, analyze trends and conduct a workforce capacity analysis.

 The Montgomery County Safety Net Safety net providers are defined as healthcare providers who serve a significant portion of patients who are classified as uninsured, enrolled in Medicaid, or other vulnerable populations, and those living in under served rural or inner city areas. Montgomery County’S safety net includes three community health center organizations, two free clinics, hospital emergency departments, a few dental clinics, and the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board mental health agencies. In addition to delivering more affordable care, safety net providers often are better able to meet the complex social, cultural, and linguistic needs that are more prevalent among vulnerable populations.

 Montgomery County’s safety net providers will remain an important part of the healthcare delivery system going forward as the Affordable Care Act is implemented, serving much of the newly insured population and continuing to serve as the safety net for the remaining uninsured and vulnerable populations. Because the safety net provides care for patients with some of the most complex needs and the fewest resources, the anticipated stresses of health reform on the overall health care delivery system—increased demand, maldistributed workforce, shifts in financing streams – may be felt more acutely in the safety net.  Demand for the Montgomery County safety net is driven by factors such as the economy, uninsured rate and health status, with data revealing health disparities within the county along income and racial/ethnic lines. Health status, income, race/ethnicity, poverty by family and by community, and access to health care are all linked, with geographic analysis showing alignment between the biggest gap in primary care, the most prevalent health disparities, and high rates of emergency department utilization.

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 For more information regarding the Montgomery County ACA Task Force please contact,
Jessica Abernathy, Office of Family & Children First, staff support for the MCACATF at
abernathyj@mcohio.org or 937-496-7154.

 For more information regarding the Health Policy Institute of Ohio click here.

Highlights
2014 Community Needs Assessment

The 2014 Community Needs Assessment is now available! Click to see the full report.