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    Residential Permits (1, 2, or 3 Family Dwellings) Questions

    1. What work does Montgomery County Building Regulations Division regulate?  
    2. Is any construction exempt from building permits?
    3. What do I need to submit in order to get a permit?
    4. How long does it take to get a permit?
    5. Can I get a partial permit to get construction started more quickly?
    6. Once I obtain a permit, what inspections do are required?
    7. What are your local climatic design criteria for structural design?
    8. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a small shed?
    9. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a detached garage?
    10. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a deck?
    11. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a swimming pool?
    12. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a post and frame building?
    13. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a room addition?
    14. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a New One, Two or Three Family Dwelling?
    15. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a New Manufactured Home?
    16. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a single family Industrialized unit?
    17. What is the difference in an Industrialized unit and a Manufactured home?
    18. How close can I build to the property lines?
    19. What areas of Montgomery County are under your jurisdiction?
    1. What work does Montgomery County Building Regulations Division regulate?

    One, Two and Three Family Dwellings and their accessory structures, commonly referred to as "Residential Construction": Per local resolution, Montgomery County regulates new construction, additions, and alterations of these dwellings and their accessory structures, including work such as finishing basements, converting garages to living spaces, and deck construction. Enforcement extends to both structural and non-structural construction, and includes mechanical and electrical work as well.

    In addition to code compliance listed above, we also check for compliance with Flood Plain Damage Prevention Standards and Airport Zoning requirements around Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

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    2. Is any construction exempt from building permits?

    Maintenance and repairs may be made without building permits, but such repairs cannot include any structural work, mechanical or electrical work, or construction or removal of non-structural walls or partitions. Permits are not required for cosmetic changes such as painting or carpeting, but such work must still comply with applicable codes, such as not exceeding applicable flame spread requirements. Refer to RCO R105.2

    Some work is exempt from local code enforcement, such as state or federal projects built on state or federally owned land, used for governmental purposes. In those cases, the state or federal government oversees code compliance. Other buildings such as those used for agricultural purposes are also exempt. If you have questions about whether your project is exempt, be sure to check with the building department before proceeding. Refer to OBC Section 101.2 and 105.2.

    Certain minor residential construction has been deemed exempt from building permits, such as single story detached sheds that do not exceed 200 square feet in floor area.

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    3. What do I need to submit in order to get a permit?

    Residential permit applications must include two copies of drawings that describe the proposed work and how it will meet applicable code requirements, along with a completed application. Submittal requirements are described in more detail on the back of the Residential Application Form. Upon approval of a permit, we will return one set with approval marks and notes, and keep one set on file in our offices. Refer to back of Residential Permit Application for more detailed information.
    See Project Success Checklists.

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    4. How long does it take to get a permit?

    Most Residential Permits are processed within three to five working days after receiving enough information to do a plan review.

    When submittals are found to be deficient, either because the submittal is incomplete or the work proposed is code deficient, the applicant is notified of the need to submit additional or corrected information, and the "turn around clock" stops until a response is received. Time spent waiting for such responses is not counted against turn around goals.

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    5.Can I get a partial permit to get construction started more quickly?

    A variety of Partial Permits are available to expedite construction. The most common is the issuance of a Footing/Foundation Permit which is processed in one to three days. Footing/Foundation permits are not available for residential additions or accessory buildings. Again, see the back of the application forms for submittal information.

    Some over the counter permits are available for Electric Permits, Gas Piping Permits, Residential Mechanical Permits, and Demolition Permits. Also, Residential Footing/Foundation Permits are available on a same day basis for new homes, with proper information being provided.

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    6. Once I obtain a permit, what inspections do are required?

    Both Commercial and Residential work must have rough inspections of construction progress before work is covered up, and final inspections after work is complete. Typically all sub trade inspections such as electrical and mechanical must be approved before the main permit (general construction) inspection will be done. Approved plans must be on the jobsite for each inspection. Refer to the Commercial Inspection Checklist or Residential Inspection Checklist for more detailed information.

    Note: Footings, Slabs, and Gas or Electric Trenches must be inspected before concrete is poured or backfill material is placed.

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    7. What are your local climatic design criteria for structural design?

    Residential Criteria:
    Table R301.2(1)
    Ground Snow Load - 20 psf
    Wind Speed - 90 mph
    Wind Topographic Effects - No
    Seismic Design Category - A or B
    Weathering - severe
    Frost line depth - 32"
    Termite - moderate to heavy
    Decay - slight to moderate
    Winter design temp. - 0 to 10 degrees
    Ice Shield Underlayment Required - yes
    Flood Hazards - see firm map
    Air Freezing Index - less or equal to 1,500
    Mean annual temp - 50 degrees

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    8. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a small shed?

    Detached sheds more than 200 square feet require a building permit and a foundation similar to a house, garage or post and frame building (pole barn). Detached sheds between 200 square feet and 400 square feet may have footings only extending 12" below grade. 
    1. Submit  a Site plan
    2. Submit a Floor Framing Plan
    3. Submit a Cross Section
    4. Submit Exterior Views.
    See Sample Drawings

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    9. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a detached garage?

    All garages require a building Permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Garage
    See Sample Drawings for a garage

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    10. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a deck?

    All elevated decks and all patio covers requires a building permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Deck 
    See Sample Drawings for Deck

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    11. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a swimming pool?

    All above ground swimming pools over 24" high and all in ground swimming pools require a building permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Swimming Pool

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    12. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a Post and frame building?

    Post and frame buildings Require a Building permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Post and Frame Building 
    See Sample Drawings for a Post and Frame Building

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    13. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a Room addition?

    All room additions require a building permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Room Addition. 
    Also see Sample Drawings of a Room Addition.

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    14. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a New One, Two or Three Family Dwelling?

    All new dwellings require a building permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Single Family Dwelling

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    15. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a New Manufactured Home?

    Building permits for the installation of manufactured homes in Montgomery County are regulated through the Ohio Manufactured Home Commission. See www.omhc.ohio.gov 

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    16. What do I need to apply for a building permit for a single family Industrialized unit?

    All industrialized single family homes require a building permit.
    See Project Success Checklist for a Residential Industrialized unit

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    17. What is the difference in an Industrialized unit and a Manufactured home?

    An Industrialized unit has been approved by the Ohio board of Building Standards. A Manufactured home must be approved by HUD. (Housing and Urban Development) See www.omhc.ohio.gov 

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    18. How close can I build to the property lines?

    The residential building code does not restrict how close you build to the property line. Any structure and overhangs within 5 feet of the property line must be a one hour rated separation walls. We also require any buildings being placed within a utility easement be approved by the utilities, typically the phone company, electric company, cable TV and the sewer provider. The Zoning Department may have property line clearances greater than these.  

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    19. What areas of Montgomery County are under your jurisdiction?

    All townships in the county are under the jurisdiction of Montgomery County Building Regulations Division. Also, some villages and cities contract with Montgomery County to do all or some building code enforcement for them. Refer to the Montgomery County Building Regulations Jurisdictional Chart. Cities that have their own complete building departments include Brookville, Carlisle, Centerville, Dayton, Englewood, Germantown, Kettering, Miamisburg, Oakwood, Springboro, Vandalia, and West Carrollton.

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